Party discipline stricter than law

must reads

This scrapbook of links and artifacts was compiled 15 December 2014

Anti-corruption
The People’s Daily has a chart illustrating the process for going after tigers, i.e. very senior corrupt officials : 图解:中央政治局委员级别“大老虎”的查处程序. Tencent News has details on the case of Liu Tienan, the fallen former Director of the National Energy Administration: 辩护律师:刘铁男后悔教子不严 将接受法庭判决.

Xinhua English tells us that
Xinhua: Party discipline stricter than law, and also that China has launched a website for complaints about Party officials, which you can find at zygjjg.12388.gov.cn

South North Water Diversion project
China’s water diversion project starts to flow to Beijing

On Friday afternoon, China quietly inaugurated one of the biggest engineering projects of all time: the South-North Water Diversion, a £48bn, 2,400km network of canals and tunnels, designed to divert 44.8bn cubic metres of water annually from China’s humid south to its parched, industrialised north.

Xinhua’s story on the project is here: 南水北调中线通水年均调水百亿立方米

New Silk Road
Xinhua: World’s longest train journey reaches its final destination in Madrid

Dissidents
Bloomberg: China Sentences Uighur Scholar’s Tohti Students to Up to 8 Years
Boxun: 中央民族大学7学生“分裂国家”被判

Reuters: China releases one of its longest-serving political prisoners, relative says

China has freed one of its longest-serving political prisoners, the ethnic Mongol dissident Hada, who has spent much of the last two decades behind bars, his uncle said on Tuesday.

Smoking
Reuters: China plans hike in cigarette taxes, prices to deter smokers
21Food.cn: 首部国家控烟法规有望出台
New York Times: China’s E-Cigarette Boom Lacks Oversight for Safety

Almost all the world’s e-cigarettes are made without oversight, and experts say flawed or sloppy manufacturing could account for some of the hazards seen in the devices.

Internet and media
USA Today reports on Lu Wei’s visit to US Internet companies: Zuckerberg meets with China’s Internet regulator

On the desk next to Zuckerberg’s laptop was a copy of The Governance of China, an English language collection of the speeches of Chinese President Xi Jinping.

“I also bought this book for my colleagues,” Zuckerberg told Lu, in Chinese, China.com reported. “I want them to understand socialism with Chinese characteristics.”

Zuckerberg impressed many Chinese citizens in October by speaking in Mandarin during an entire question-and-answer session at a college, revealing his heavily accented but highly creditable language skills. Zuckerberg said his reasons for learning the language included his wife, who is ethnically Chinese; his interest in Chinese culture; and his love of a challenge.

Facebook faces huge challenges to fulfill its mission to “connect the world” without compromising content and operations as Beijing would likely require. But Zuckerberg’s charm offensive with Lu reveals he’s picked up more than just Mandarin.

“It shows a mastery of the type of sycophancy that can have results in China,” said Jeremy Goldkorn, the founder of Danwei, a Beijing-based media research firm. “Even if there is no chance in hell of Facebook operating in China in the near future, they have long-term ambitions,” he said.

CFR.org: The Top Ten Cybersecurity Incidents in China of 2014

Mixed Reaction to China’s Plan to Send Artists to Countryside

Fei Chang Dao: Xiaomi, Baidu Promise Their Mobile App Stores Will Abide by Socialism and China’s National Interests

Economy and business
The People’s Daily reports on Highlights of China’s Central Economic Work Conference; the infographic reproduced at left is from this WeChat page: 中央经济工作会议必读50句话和6大看点
2014-12-12 共产党员

Mobius Says China’s Bull Market Is Just Getting Started

Bloomberg: Lei Answers Jack Ma Pollution Jibe With Air Purifier

Africa
Ventures-africa.com: Ivory Coast Gets $875m From China’s Eximbank For Port Construction

Central America
Wantchinatimes.com: Thousands take to street in Nicaragua to protest China canal deal

The National Anthem
The People’s Daily reports on new rules for singing the national anthem中共中央办公厅、国务院办公厅印发《关于规范国歌奏唱礼仪的实施意见》. CCN has this report: No weddings, no funerals: China decrees new rules when singing national anthem

A series of rules proposed by the government will set strict limits on when, where and how “March of the Volunteers” — the anthem of the People’s Republic since 1949 — can be performed, state-run Xinhua news agency reported Friday.

The anthem is not allowed to be played or sung at private weddings and funerals, dancing parties, commercial events, or any other setting with “an inappropriate atmosphere.”When singing the anthem, people should dress appropriately, stand still and be full of energy, according to the government. The rules then get technical: People must sing the powerful marching song in its entirety, enunciate every word and follow the rhythm. No one is permitted to start or stop singing midway — and altering the melody, lyrics or musical arrangement is forbidden. No whispering, applauding or talking on the phone, either, while the anthem is played.

Nanjing massacre commemoration
People’s Daily: 党和国家领导人将出席南京大屠杀死难者国家公祭仪式
Straits Times: Set aside hate, China’s President Xi Jinping says on anniversary of Nanjing Massacre
Xi sends mixed message to Japan at Nanjing ceremony

Confucius Prize
The New York Times: China’s Defiant Choice for Its Peace Prize: Castro

The Confucius Peace Prize was first given out in late 2010 as a rejoinder to the Nobel Peace Prize. President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia is a past recipient.

Justice
New Tang Dynasty TV (a Falungong operation): Executed Teenager’s Case Reopened After 18 Years
A retrial of an Inner Mongolia teenager’s case was finally granted recently after 18 years of struggle. The teenager, Hugejiltu, became a suspect from an informant and was executed within two months. After the murderer confessed, the case retrial was put on hold for more than 9 years.

Netease / Legal Evening News: 内蒙古自治区公安厅开始调查呼格案全体办案警员

There is further background in this Danwei.org posting from 2009: In Inner Mongolia, justice denied and then delayed.